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Slippery Slope of Suspicionless Searches: the “Special Needs Exception” and 10th Anniversary of MacWade

November 19th, 2016

Slippery Slope of Suspicionless Searches: the “Special Needs Exception” and 10th Anniversary of MacWade

By Shaun Prunotto  In response to commuter train bombings in Madrid (2004) and London (2005), the NYPD implemented a policy involving random, suspicionless searches of bags and packages brought into the NYC subways. The New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU) immediately challenged this policy, describing it as “unprecedented, unlawful,” and “unlikely to have any meaningful deterrent effect on terrorist activity.”Despite the organization’s best efforts, search checkpoints persist with the court’s blessing. Ten years out from the decision to allow subway checkpoints, and with subway ridership at its peak since 1948, record numbers of New Yorkers are vulnerable to subway searches.

A Battle to Restore Voting Rights To Those With Felony Convictions in Virginia

November 17th, 2016

A Battle to Restore Voting Rights To Those With Felony Convictions in Virginia

By Brendan Kreckel  Earlier this year, Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe issued an executive order to restore voting rights to more individuals convicted of felonies in his state. Republican lawmakers vehemently opposed the order, bringing the matter to the Virginia Supreme Court. The court invalidated the order and required that newly registered citizens have their rights revoked once again.

NYC Looks To Open Data Portal To More Users

November 11th, 2016

NYC Looks To Open Data Portal To  More Users

By Eric Hornbeck New York City collects vast amounts of data every day on the activities of its agencies and citizens. For the last several years it has posted reams of that data, from restaurant health inspections to 311 calls, on its open data portal. As the availability and use of that data has increased, it’s also become a source of profit for one particular group of New Yorkers — those on Wall Street. That for-profit use of government data has raised some concerns, but it’s largely been off the city’s radar. Instead, the city wants to make sure its data is used by even more users, including community organizations and nonprofits.

Challenges to Achieving New York City’s Affordable Housing Goals: Reconciling Mandatory Inclusionary Housing, Community Preference Requirements, and Fair Housing Laws

May 26th, 2016

Challenges to Achieving New York City’s Affordable Housing Goals: Reconciling Mandatory Inclusionary Housing, Community Preference Requirements, and Fair Housing Laws

By Professor Andrea McArdle  I. Introduction Under the mayoral administration of Bill de Blasio, New York City has embarked on an ambitious affordable housing initiative mandating that real estate developers include below-market-rate units in rezoned areas of the city.  Although approved by the New York City Council, the policy faces continuing community opposition, the expiration of a state tax subsidy law that would have attracted developers to participate in the plan, and likely complications as a result of a lawsuit filed last year challenging a community preference provision the City enforces with its affordable housing projects. This series of developments presents a number of challenges to realizing   the City’s affordable housing goals.

Shut Out of Airbnb: A Proposal for Remedying Housing Discrimination in the Modern Sharing Economy

May 26th, 2016

Shut Out of Airbnb: A Proposal for Remedying Housing Discrimination in the Modern Sharing Economy

By Jamila Jefferson-Jones* Introduction The modern sharing economy[1] is a diverse marketplace made up of various types of organizations and structures, including shared housing.[2]  What ties these various components together is that they “generally facilitate community ownership, localized production, sharing, cooperation, [and] small scale enterprise.”[3]  The housing segment of the sharing economy is also a part of what has been termed the “experience economy.”[4]   Within the experience economy, “the crucial role of experiences [is] understood as (positive) emotions, values and identities in value creation.”[5]  Thus, in theory, the housing segment of the sharing economy combines both the community and trust elements of “sharing” and the freedom and adventure of the “experience.”

2016 Fordham Urban Law Journal Alumni Banquet

February 26th, 2016

2016 Fordham Urban Law Journal Alumni Banquet

Please RSVP here Please join the Volume 43 Editorial Board and the Fordham Urban Law Journal Alumni Association for our annual Alumni Banquet at: Opia 130 E. 57th Street (located in the Renaissance Hotel) April 20, 2016 6:30 PM Cocktail Hour 7:30 PM Dinner Honoring the 2016 Lefkowitz Award Recipient: Maria L. Marcus Please RSVP here Alumni: $55/person Current Members: Free To purchase a ticket or to sponsor the event, please contact Alumni Association President, Jason Libou at jaylibou@gmail.com Please send dues and ticket payments to: Jason Libou 319 East 90th Street, Apt. 4A New York, NY 10128 or via PayPal to jaylibou@gmail.com If you encounter any difficulties with the RSVP form or have any other questions, please contact the Business Editor, Shai Vander at svander@fordham.edu

Volume XLIII Editorial Board

March 9th, 2015

Volume XLIII Editorial Board

Congratulations to the 2015-2016 Editorial Board of the Fordham Urban Law Journal!   Editor-in-Chief: Jenna Lowy Managing Editor: Sean Jaime Business Editor: Shai Vander Online Managing Editor: Henry Parr Senior Articles Editor: Michael D’Ambrosio Writing and Research Editor: Rodrigo Bacus Cooper-Walsh Editor: Nicolette Ursini Symposium Editor: Moshe Peters   Notes and Articles Editor: Hunter Brook Notes and Articles Editor: Mary Dolan Notes and Articles Editor: Carlos Ugalde Notes and Articles Editor: William Brophy Notes and Articles Editor: Colleen Powers Notes and Articles Editor: Heather Zimmer Notes and Articles Editor: Natasia Siveski

Urban Planning: The Truth Behind Hosting a Super Bowl

February 7th, 2015

Urban Planning: The Truth Behind Hosting a Super Bowl

By Carlos F. Ugalde On February 1st, the New England Patriots rallied late to win Super Bowl XLIX over the Seattle Seahawks at the University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona. I am sure that many of the viewers wondered why the championship game took place in Arizona rather than Seattle, WA, or Foxborough, MA.

De Blasio Prefers School to Work: The Fate of Workfare

November 17th, 2014

By Henry Parr The New York Times reported last week[1] that Mayor Bill de Blasio has vowed to reform the city’s welfare program and to remove its “workfare program.” Workfare is one of the city’s largest welfare programs that requires recipients to work assigned jobs in order to receive unemployment assistance. Under the city’s current Work Experience Program (WEP), participants have to work up to 35 hours a week at assigned public agencies, non-profits, religious institutions, and private companies, in order to receive public assistance.[2]

A Significant Stride for New York’s Legal System: Cuomo Agrees to Settlement

November 13th, 2014

By Jared Gans   Over fifty years ago, the Supreme Court held in the case of Gideon v. Wainwright that states are required to provide defense lawyers to people charged with serious crimes and who are unable to afford legal counsel.   Almost everyone is familiar with the Miranda warning, which states in part that “[y]ou have the right to an attorney…If you cannot afford one, one will be provided for you at no cost to you.” However, is there really no cost?