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WE’VE MOVED!

October 19th, 2018

WE'VE MOVED!

Thanks for taking the time to visit our webpage! We have moved our website and are no longer updating the content on this site. Please visit us at our NEW webpage at news.law.fordham.edu/fulj/.

EVENT: ULJ Symposium – Reimagining Localism Friday, February 16, 2018

February 7th, 2018

EVENT: ULJ Symposium - Reimagining Localism Friday, February 16, 2018

EVENT: Rikers: An American Jail (Tuesday, February 20, 2018)

January 30th, 2018

EVENT: Rikers: An American Jail (Tuesday, February 20, 2018)

The A2J Initiative at Fordham Law School is sponsoring an event focused on the future of the Rikers Island Prison Complex and its effect on New York City’s criminal justice system. The event will feature a screening of excerpts from the documentary “Rikers: An American Jail,” with an introduction from journalist Bill Moyers and a panel discussion moderated by Scott Pelley of 60 Minutes.  Two of the panelists, Michael Jacobson, Executive Director of the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance, and Jonathan Lippman, Former Chief Judge of New York and Chair of the Independent Commission on NYC Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform, appear in the Urban Law Journal. Event Details: Tuesday, February 20, 2018 6 – 6:30 p.m., reception | 6:30 – 8 p.m., program Fordham Law School 150 West 62nd Street New York NY 10023 MODERATOR Scott Pelley Journalist; Correspondent on 60 Minutes, CBS INTRODUCTION Bill Moyers Journalist; Executive Editor of “Rikers: An American Jail” PANELISTS […]

EVENT: Fighting Discrimination in Healthcare in 2018 (January 30, 2018)

January 30th, 2018

EVENT: Fighting Discrimination in Healthcare in 2018 (January 30, 2018)

                        The Feerick Center for Social Justice is hosting McGregor Smyth, Executive Director of New York Lawyers for the Public Interest, as part of its Social Justice Luncheon Speaker Series.  The topic will be Fighting Discrimination in Healthcare in 2018.  The Urban Law Journal is a co-sponsor of the event. Event Details: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 12:30 p.m. Fordham Law School 150 West 62nd Street Room 4-01  Pizza will be served. RSVP HERE  For more information please email  wtamayoabreu@fordham.edu  Co-Sponsors: Advocates for Sexual Health & Rights Asian Pacific Law Student Association Black Law Students Association Catholic Law Students Association Consumer Law Advocates Domestic Violence Action Center  Environmental Law Advocates Fordham Consumer Law Advocates  Fordham Law Review Fordham Law Women  Fordham OUTLaws   Fordham Urban Law Journal Immigration Advocacy Project Irish Law Students Association Latin American Law Students Association  Lawyering for Reproductive […]

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Fordham Urban Law Journal Reviewing Articles on Affordable Housing and Land Use!

October 6th, 2017

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Fordham Urban Law Journal Reviewing Articles on Affordable Housing and Land Use!

The Fordham Urban Law Journal is now accepting articles for Volume 45’s March 2018 Issue, centered around Affordable Housing and Land Use. The Fordham Urban Law Journal has a strong history of addressing legal and public policy issues affecting urban populations across the nation and throughout the world.  Heading into its 45th year, the Journal is the Law School’s second-oldest publication and its most-cited specialty journal.  This upcoming issue will focus on the issue of Affordable Housing in Urban Settings, and mechanisms by which to further Affordable Housing goals. The Journal welcomes articles addressing:  zoning and land use issues as they relate to urban areas, community land trusts and other novel ways to create affordable housing, the right to counsel in housing court in New York, and gentrification and its effect on urban areas.  This list is in no way exhaustive and we invite you to submit an article proposal on any Affordable Housing topic you believe deserves attention. If you […]

THE 2017 COOPER-WALSH COLLOQUIUM: Taking a Bite out of the Big Apple: A Conversation about Urban Food Policy – Friday, October 20, 2017

October 5th, 2017

THE 2017 COOPER-WALSH COLLOQUIUM: Taking a Bite out of the Big Apple: A Conversation about Urban Food Policy - Friday, October 20, 2017

Friday, October 20, 2017 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Fordham Law School Hill Faculty Conference Room (7-119) | 7th floor 150 West 62nd Street New York, NY 10023 Schedule Registration: 9:15 – 9:45 a.m. Welcome and Introduction 9:45 – 10:00 am Dean Matthew Diller from Fordham University School of Law Ten Years of Food Policy Governance in New York City: Lessons for the Next Decade by Dr. Nicholas Freudenberg 10:00 – 10:45 a.m. In the last decade, New York City has created dozens of new food policies and programs to improve nutritional well-being, promote food security, create food systems that support community and economic development and achieve other important goals.  These initiatives built on the city’s prior efforts to create healthier food environments and used existing and new governance mechanisms to consider, enact and implement changes in how New York City produces, distributes and consumes the food that sustains its […]

THE POLICING IN AMERICA SYMPOSIUM: On Behalf of the Community

August 16th, 2017

THE POLICING IN AMERICA SYMPOSIUM:  On Behalf of the Community

By Eric J. Miller* The development of the institutional approach to policing, and procedure more generally, is one of the most exciting features of criminal procedure over the past decade. More accurately, there are a series of institutional approaches—doctrinal, philosophical, sociological, empirical—that all claim that there is independent value in regulating the police, separate from the additional value of protecting suspects’ rights.

THE POLICING IN AMERICA SYMPOSIUM: Rafa Esparza’s Red Summer

August 16th, 2017

THE POLICING IN AMERICA SYMPOSIUM:  Rafa Esparza’s Red Summer

Yxta Maya Murray* Yxta Maya Murray is a professor at Loyola Law School.  She has authored six novels, and also serves as a contributing editor for Artillery Magazine, an arts publication based in Los Angeles. On Saturday, August 13, 2016, from dawn to dusk, performance artist Rafa Esparza carved weapons out of dead trees in a small clearing of Los Angeles’s Elysian Park.  His piece, commissioned by the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles for its Made in L.A. biennial exhibition,[1] was titled  RED SUMMER, freedom is an endless meeting.  And I don’t miss your heat.  But here we are again (“Red Summer”).[2]  Red Summer memorializes the year 2015, which Esparza assesses as “the bloodiest in the recorded history of police killings in the United States.”[3]  In an effort to bear witness to that period of atrocity, Esparza stood in a drought-burned patch of the park that sits within hearing distance […]

THE POLICING IN AMERICA SYMPOSIUM: American Policing in the Post-Ferguson Era

August 16th, 2017

THE POLICING IN AMERICA SYMPOSIUM:  American Policing in the Post-Ferguson Era

By Justin Nix* American policing is currently in the midst of a legitimacy crisis, fueled primarily by numerous highly publicized fatal shootings of black citizens over the last two and a half years.[1] Arguably the most consequential was the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. This incident sparked protests throughout the United States and fueled the growth of the Black Lives Matter Movement and Campaign Zero, which have helped raise awareness about police use of force.[2] Since Ferguson, many claims have been made about crime, policing in general, and police use of force – particularly against minorities. I outline and discuss some of the more prominent claims below, and comment on the need for better official data, which would provide for a more informed national dialogue on police use of force. I conclude by reviewing some promising avenues for police training moving forward.

THE POLICING IN AMERICA SYMPOSIUM: We Need to Talk About Police Disciplinary Records

August 7th, 2017

THE POLICING IN AMERICA SYMPOSIUM:  We Need to Talk About Police Disciplinary Records

By Kate Levine* In March 2017, an employee of New York’s Civilian Complaint Review Board leaked the disciplinary record of Daniel Pantaleo to the media.[1] Pantaleo, the police officer who choked Eric Garner to death in the video[2] that went public and horrified many citizens, is under federal investigation[3] after a Staten Island grand jury refused to indict him for Garner’s death.[4] Legal Aid Society attorneys had unsuccessfully sought the release of his records in the courts for years.[5] The leak of his records is the public face of an important but rarely discussed issue facing police, legislators, judges, lawyers, and scholars who care both about transparency for public servants and privacy for individual citizens: how and when police should be forced to make their disciplinary records public.