Exclusionary Housing: Discrimination in the Sharing Economy and New York City’s Answer to Gentrification

Challenges to Achieving New York City’s Affordable Housing Goals: Reconciling Mandatory Inclusionary Housing, Community Preference Requirements, and Fair Housing Laws

May 26th, 2016

Challenges to Achieving New York City’s Affordable Housing Goals: Reconciling Mandatory Inclusionary Housing, Community Preference Requirements, and Fair Housing Laws

By Professor Andrea McArdle  I. Introduction Under the mayoral administration of Bill de Blasio, New York City has embarked on an ambitious affordable housing initiative mandating that real estate developers include below-market-rate units in rezoned areas of the city.  Although approved by the New York City Council, the policy faces continuing community opposition, the expiration of a state tax subsidy law that would have attracted developers to participate in the plan, and likely complications as a result of a lawsuit filed last year challenging a community preference provision the City enforces with its affordable housing projects. This series of developments presents a number of challenges to realizing   the City’s affordable housing goals.

Shut Out of Airbnb: A Proposal for Remedying Housing Discrimination in the Modern Sharing Economy

May 26th, 2016

Shut Out of Airbnb: A Proposal for Remedying Housing Discrimination in the Modern Sharing Economy

By Jamila Jefferson-Jones* Introduction The modern sharing economy[1] is a diverse marketplace made up of various types of organizations and structures, including shared housing.[2]  What ties these various components together is that they “generally facilitate community ownership, localized production, sharing, cooperation, [and] small scale enterprise.”[3]  The housing segment of the sharing economy is also a part of what has been termed the “experience economy.”[4]   Within the experience economy, “the crucial role of experiences [is] understood as (positive) emotions, values and identities in value creation.”[5]  Thus, in theory, the housing segment of the sharing economy combines both the community and trust elements of “sharing” and the freedom and adventure of the “experience.”